feast of seven fishes
 

The experience of New York City around the holidays is a thing of pure magic. As the thermometer drops, the spirits of the people seem to rise. It's nigh impossible to not get swept up in the excitement, and one will often find oneself lost in the moment and gawking at the falling snowflakes like a child.

At Hearth, it's certainly one of our favorite times of the year.

And, once again, we're opening our doors to our friends and family to join us for our Feast of the Seven Fishes dinner on Christmas Eve.

The Feast of the Seven Fishes
(full a la carte menu will also be available)

First Course
WARM SEPIA & OCTOPUS SALAD
Crispy Farro, Celery, Lemon

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Second Course
STEAMED CLAMS "CASINO"
Manilla Clams, Red Pepper, Smoked Bacon, Breadcrumbs

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Third Course
CHITARRA
Shrimp, White Wine, Parsley, Garlic

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Fourth Course
CACCIUCCO
Black Bass, Calamari, Mussels

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Dessert
CHESTNUT SEMIFREDDO


88.00 per guest

To book a reservation, please call Hearth at
646.602.1300

(A credit card will be required to hold the booking)


A History of the Feast of the Seven Fishes
What apparently originated in southern Italy many moons ago has now become a uniquely Italian-American tradition. Also known as The Vigil, the Feast of the Seven Fishes harkens back to the glory days of abstinence in the Catholic Church...this abstinence is of course the not eating of meat or milk products on specified Holy Days or on Fridays (since our household celebrated "Hot Dog Fridays", this was one tenet of Catholicism we had trouble keeping, along with paying for indulgences).

The matter of "7" courses of fish generally is thought to relate to the 7 Sacraments. Or it could be the 7 Days of Creation. Or it could be the 7 Deadly Sins. Or it could be because both Mickey Mantle and David Beckham wore #7 on their jerseys. Or, it could just be that "7" is a number representing perfection
(the Father, Son and Holy Spirit are 3 and the Earth is 4 and 7 references the presence of God on Earth).
Ultimately, the number of fishes/dishes is secondary to the fact that the culture of the table is being shared by family and friends.

Hearth